04
Oct
11

A History of Take Me Out

Take Me Out made its Broadway debut on February 27, 2003 and won the Tony Award for Best Play that year. It was written by Richard Greenberg, who has written over 25 plays including the popular Three Days of Rain and The Violet Hour.

Much of the play is set in the locker room of a professional baseball team, and as such has an all-male cast that explores themes of homophobia, racism, class and masculinity in sports.

The play’s main character, Darren Lemming, is a popular and successful mixed-race baseball player at the peak of his career when he decides to come out. Several of his teammates react strongly (some supportive and accepting, and some not), and the drama plays out over the course of a baseball season with tragic consequences.
Many believe that the character of Darren Lemming was largely basd on American Major League Baseball player Derek Jeter, of the Yankees.

derek jeter picture 1 230x300 A History of Take Me Out

And some think the inpiration for racist pitcher Shane Mungitt, was former National League pitcher John Rocker, then of the Atlanta Braves. Rocker became a household name in 2000 when he was suspended after making several homophobic and racist comments in Sports Illustrated.

j rocker 194x300 A History of Take Me Out

The show boasted a talented cast of actors, some of whom are now well-known. The leading man, Daniel Sunjata, who played Darren Lemming, has recently been seen as a recurring character on Grey’s Anatomy and Rescue Me, as well as, films like Ghosts of Girlfriends Past and The Devil Wears Prada.

Daniel Sunjata 2 233x300 A History of Take Me Out

Actor Neal Huff played the story’s main narrator, Kippy Sunderstrum. He was a regular on The Wire and has also appeared on Damages and in the multi-award winning miniseries “John Adams”.

Neal Huff A History of Take Me Out

Darren’s accountant and confidante in the show, Mason Marzac, was played by Denis O’Hare. He’s a character with one of those faces many recognize, even if they don’t know his name. He’s had recurring roles in television shows like True Blood, Brothers and Sisters, The Good Wife and films like Milk, The Changeling, Baby Mama, and The Proposal.

denis ohare 228x300 A History of Take Me Out

David Eigenberg, most well known as Steve from Sex and the City, played Toddy Koovitz. Toddy is not the smartest guy on the team, but he’s certainly one of the most vocal when it comes to disapproving of Darren’s announcement.

David Eigenberg 201x300 A History of Take Me Out

Now, coinciding with baseball playoffs and National Coming Out Month, Dominion Stage is looking for a homerun by featuring Take Me Out as the 2011-2012 season opener! The show opens Friday, October 7th!

DS Take Me Out 300x153 A History of Take Me Out

Take Me Out
By Richard Greenberg
Directed by Matthew Randall
Produced by William D. Parker

Darren Lemming, the star center fielder of the world champion New York Empires, is young, rich, famous, talented, handsome and so convinced of his popularity that when he casually announces he’s gay, he assumes the news will be readily accepted by everyone. It isn’t.

Like a good ball game, Take Me Out offers the fans a winning combination of drama and suspense, memorable personalities (and physiques), and occasional agony alternating with bouts of exhilaration. True to Dominion Stage’s mission to remain “Anything But Predictable” this entertaining production is the perfect opportunity to take someone out.

NOTE: The production includes male nudity, strong language and adult situations.

Performances
Friday, Oct 7 @ 8 p.m.
Saturday, Oct 8 @ 8 p.m.
Thursday, Oct 13 @ 8 p.m.
Friday, Oct 14 @ 8 p.m.
Saturday, Oct 15 @ 8 p.m.
Sunday, Oct 16 @ 2 p.m. (Matinee)
Thursday, Oct 20 @ 8 p.m.
Friday, Oct 21 @ 8 p.m.
Saturday, Oct 22 @ 8 p.m.

Tickets are $18 in advance, $20 at the door. So make sure you visit the Dominion Stage website to buy your tickets now!


1 Response to “A History of Take Me Out”


  1. 1 Erica Wisniewski Trackback on Oct 7th, 2011 at 5:56 pm

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